frequently asked questions

How big will my Standard Poodle be?

How big will my Standard Poodle be?

Weight: 45 – 70 pounds (20.41 – 31.75 kg)
Height: 15 – 24 inches (38.10 – 60.96 cm)
The Standard Poodle has a graceful, medium-sized frame with a rounded skull, a long head and muzzle, dark oval eyes and wide, close-hanging ears. They have long legs that give them a springy step, docked tails (usually) and compact feet. The coat is sometimes curly and wiry, sometimes soft and wavy, and can be any solid color. Grooming styles include the “pet clip” (short all over), the “Continental clip” (the hindquarters shaved, half of the tail and the upper half of the legs) “English saddle clip” (same as the “Continental Clip” except the hindquarters are not shaved), the “Puppy Clip” (this is the clip seen on Poodles under a year old in the show ring), and the “Teddy Bear clip” (this is a hair cut that is long all over including the face resembling a cuddly teddy bear).

What traits can I expect in my Standard Poodle?

What traits can I expect in my Standard Poodle?

Well-groomed, curly coat
Elegant and regal
Intelligent and trainable
Sensitive and social
Calm and agreeable

Who gets along with Standard Poodles?

Who gets along with Standard Poodles?

Singles
Seniors
Active, sporty types
Families with children


What is it like living with a Standard Poodle?

What is it like living with a Standard Poodle?

Poodles are clever and lively household companions, adaptable to their environments and are fairly easy to train — it’s no surprise that they were once very popular circus dogs. They have a few instinctual habits, like and hunting, which may be noticeable on walks or around the yard. Overall, Poodles are eager to please and a lot of fun to be around.

Poodles are generally active and agile. They are happiest with daily walks and lots of outdoor play. Without enough attention and activity, they can get bored, agitated, restless and (sometimes) destructive. Also, if you can give your Poodle the opportunity to frolic in water, by all means do.

Poodles do not like to be left alone for hours on end. They love being around people and are able to form bonds with each member of the family, as opposed to bonding with just one person. Poodles are ideal family dogs, being both patient and playful with children. They also make superb watchdogs, barking zealously when strangers approach the home.



What should I know about Standard Poodles?

What should I know about Standard Poodles?

Poodles may look dainty and demur, but in truth, these are high-stamina dogs with a stellar range of skills, including agility, obedience, hunting, cart pulling, and herding. Your pretty Poodle could be a sporty competitor in addition to a beautiful show dog.

Poodles have the tendency to bloat. So, try to feed them several small meals instead of big ones. And you must be ready to groom: They need to be combed, clipped and bathed regularly. On the plus side, they don’t shed.

Standard Poodles can live as long as 15 years. Though a relatively healthy breed, common issues can include hip dysplasia, allergies, skin conditions and cataracts.



What is the history of Standard Poodles?

What is the history of Standard Poodles?

Poodles have lived in Europe for centuries, however, no one knows for sure where they originated. Some claim Germany as their birthplace, but the consensus seems to be France, where they are considered a national breed. Descended from the now-obsolete French Water Dog, the Poodle (most likely named from the German word Pudel, or “plays in water”) was used to retrieve waterfowl for hunters. Poodles were prized for their intelligence and good manners, eventually being used in circuses and dog shows and, of course, as companions. The Standard Poodle is believed to be the oldest of the three Poodle versions. Miniature Poodles and Toy Poodles were most likely bred from the larger Standard Poodles, but all three are judged in the same categories.



When do puppy picks take place? How is it done?

When do puppy picks take place? How is it done?

Our goal in breeding is to create the best possible matches for our prospective families. We want our puppies to find their forever families and we want our families to truly feel their new puppy is the best choice for their family. At 7 weeks old, all our puppies will be evaluated using the Vollhard temperament test done by an independent evaluator. I will pass on the test results to each family and offer my recommendation for which puppies fit their lifestyle/sport needs & desires. We understand it can be difficult for families that have their heart set on a certain color. In the meantime, we will send plenty of pictures, videos, and updates on what we have observed about each puppy.




What health testing do we do?

What health testing do we do?

Full genetic panels done through Embark. Hips, elbows, patellas, cardiac, dentition, cardiac, and eyes OFA certified. We have also begun OFA testing for thyroid and SA. We also do AKC DNA testing on each of our dogs. This is sort of like a paternity test to make sure the papers you receive for your dogs are not “hung” papers. The DNA of the parents in the pedigree are compared to other relatives to make sure there is consistency in DNA markers. Papers can be fudged but DNA doesn’t lie. We also have test our dogs through BetterBred to have the best diversity in our pairings as possible. Better diversity = less chance or recessive health problems.




Do we dock tails/remove dew claws?

Do we dock tails/remove dew claws?

All of our dogs are routinely docked, only removing the end ¼ of the tail, and dewclaws removed by our veterinarian at five days old.

However, we are firm believers that tails and dewclaws do serve a purpose! We encourage each family to choose to leave their puppy au natural. We are open to allowing families to reserve their puppy at birth if they also feel strongly about keeping their puppies tail/dewclaws intact.

Dewclaws are not a digit that is used for the everyday pet that’s chilling on the sofa but they are used for more sporting type movements. The dewclaw is used when they are running in soft substrate like sand and need to make a quick turn. The dewclaw works as a stabilizing joint to help push off in the sand and prevent a twisting impact on the entire leg. They also use to dewclaw for pulling themselves up when climbing something or pulling themselves out of a pool or icy lake. Dogs without dewclaws really struggle with these types of movements. The argument you will hear for removing the dewclaw is that it could be torn off. I am a third generation dog professional (breeder and groomer), my grandfather trained military k9s and my mother owned and operated a dog daycare/kennel. None of us, in all our years have seen a dogs entire dewclaw be ripped clean off.





Where do our dogs live? What is their day/life like?

Where do our dogs live? What is their day/life like?

Our dogs live in our home. We also have females in guardian homes. Our males live their entire lives in our home and will retire here. Our dogs days are structured much like any other dogs day. We wake up and let everyone outside., They come in and eat breakfast then go out again for another potty break and play session. All of our dogs get along together without issue. We pride ourselves on having a pack of unaltered dogs without behavior problems! I work form home as a groomer. If I have anyone coming for grooming that day they will spend a little extra time playing in the yard. They can sometimes be seen jumping on our trampoline or having a good wrestling sesh on their play equipment. We live conveniently located across from a community park and dog park. While I’m busy grooming you will often find my husband walking the park paths with atleast two of our poodles. We frequently take them to the park for extra stimulation, training, and exercise. Once back inside for the morning they follow us from room to room as we do all the day to day function ie laundry, dishes, sweeping, etc. When helping our kids with homework at the table, Playing board games, or watching a movie our floor and couches are covered by poodles. We live within a 20 minute drive to beaches and two national arks with lakes and hiking trails. We love taking the poodles to these places to really run and soak up the scenery. I often say I will only shop at stores I can take my dogs to and for the most part this is true. Our most frequented stores are dog friendly; Tractor Supply, Pet Sense, Petsmart, Starbucks, Lowes, and Bath Pro Shop, at least two dogs come with us on errands. For groceries and clothes we order everything as pick up or delivery, not because we have to but because life is short and I prefer to live it making sure my dogs get as much attention as possible. At night we rotate who sleeps in their crates and who get one on one attention for the night. We do not own a kennel building and are adamantly against the, Standard Poodles are highly social and intelligent dogs we do not believe they would thrive in a kennel environment. We offer daily dental bones, weekly nail trims with a Dremel, and weekly teeth brushing. We strive to do weekly bath and blow outs, bi-weekly face, feet, and fanny shaves, and monthly hair cuts for everyone.





Where are our puppies raised/how are they socialized?

Where are our puppies raised/how are they socialized?

Our puppies are raised in our home. Their nails are trimmed weekly with nail clippers from 1-3 weeks and then a dremel from 4 weeks on. They are weighed each week. At 3.5-4 weeks we begin weekly baths, blow drying, and face, feet, tail band/sanitary shaves with a 30 blade. For the first 4 weeks the whelping box (4ftx4ft) is in our bedroom right next to your bed. I spend quite a bit of time watching everyone all day and night at this stage to make sure everyone is thriving. We use a vet bed flooring that is high plush which allows for better traction on their growing legs which promotes proper hip development. We do ENS from day 3-16. At 2-3 weeks we introduce tactile items and offer one new experience or novelty item each day. At 3-4 weeks we introduce a litter box, soft obstacle challenges, sound protocol (startle recovery, vacuum, hair dryer, tv, classical music, etc.), and we begin the puppy call at meal times. At 4-6 weeks they are moved to our transitional toddler pen that it 8ftx6ft in our living room. We continue the puppy call but add on some barriers. We introduce how to take a treat and reward manding with attention or treats. At 6-8 weeks the pen is expanded 8ftx10ft. We introduce them to the outside but we limit their outside exposure for their own safety. We also add different climbing challenges such as wobble boards, tunnels, stairs, rockers, and continue to add novelty items and sounds (thunder, fireworks etc.). I also have five children ages 4, 7, 9, 11, and 13 that are very hands on with all the puppies daily. They play a big part in helping me socialize the puppies in a positive way with children. The puppies are checked by our vet at 5 days old. Tails are docked (removing only the end 1/4 of the tail) and dewclaws removed at this time. We deworm weekly at 2 and 4 weeks with pyrantel and at 6 weeks with fenbendazole. At 6 weeks the puppies receive their first vaccinations and thorough exam from our vet. If their fecal is clear at this time we will discontinue biweekly deworming. At 7 weeks they are microchipped with an AKC reunite microchip that is registered to their new family.




What colors do we breed?

What colors do we breed?

We do not believe breeding and producing every color under the sun is the best thing to improve the breed. Instead, we prefer to focus on a select few colors so that we can fine tune the conformation, temperament, and health of these colors. Red, white, and red & white parti are our focus.




Why do we breed?

Why do we breed?

In order to answer this question, I need to take a few steps back…

The first Standard Poodle I met and fell in love with was when I was 11 years old. This was a time before the mass hysteria of “doodle” breeding really became widespread in America. Working at my mother’s dog daycare, I saw one particular Standard Poodle shine above all the rest. Not afraid of anything. He was super happy, playful, and goofy. He would enter daycare everyday ready to play with any dog, from the massive intimidating dogs like a Pyrenees and Saint Bernards, to your muscle/power dogs like Rotties and Pitties, to your average happy go lucky dogs like Goldens and Labs. He even played with more delicate/sensitive dogs that were pickier about playmates like Greyhounds, Spaniels, and Walking Hound Mixes. This Standard Poodle could befriend them all.
He was the sunshine of the daycare floor. He walked in and demanded attention by the shear way he graced the daycare floor. He did not walk or run, he simply floated. His light apricot coat, in a town and county cut, sparkled in the artificial florescent lighting. After getting ‘down and dirty’ this poodle often needed a refresher bath and blow out before heading home to his family. It was my responsibility to spruce him up. It only took one word, his name, here he comes bounding over the sea of dogs for his chance in the grooming salon. Around the corner, and into the tub, no leash is needed. He would jump from the tub to the table with nothing more than a point of the finger. He stood like a seasoned show dog… What?! A dog that can play, have fun, make me laugh, AND has self-control when needed?!?! That same pride that carried him onto the daycare floor everyday followed him onto the grooming table. I was in awe!
What faults could I find with this breed?! Do they shed? No. Are they temperamental with young children? Maybe they have a short fuse? Nope, not even close. Standard Poodles adore kids of all ages. Are they aggressive with strangers or strange dogs? No, absolutely not. Aggression should never be in their vocabulary; this would go entirely against the breed standard… Well, maybe they’re difficult to train? No! As the second smartest dog breed of all time this dog is highly intelligent and learns incredibly fast. Basic house training, crate training, and leash walking would be a breeze. I was determined to find something “wrong”. The only fault with the breed I could find was the well-known stigma that this was “foo foo” dog. Ok, ok, so breed standard tells us this is a hunting breed with few behavior problems. This is a German water retriever created to retrieve ducks alongside goldens and labs. The breed is so versatile it was used as a war dog alongside German Shepherds during WWII. Today is still frequently used as a certified service dog to complete tasks for disabled citizens to provide them with a higher chance at equal living opportunities. The Standard Poodle loves everyone and is easy to train… When asking average people what their thoughts about Standard Poodles the resounding response is still well they’re to prissy or foo foo, ultimately refereeing to the non-shedding curly coat! Wow! This is a breed that needs advocates!
Here I am almost 20 years later and there is a poodle mix on every corner. In my grooming salon, I encounter more “doodles” with health and behavior problems than any other breed. The doodle pandemic stemmed from the need to NOT have a “foo-foo” dog. Instead, they buy these mixed breed dogs. The unpredictable mix then has health problems, behavior problems, and/or STILL sheds… It breaks my heart. If Standard Poodle were not known for the exaggerated continental haircuts but instead known for their teddy bear “floof” and happy/loving personality this the doodle craze may not have exploded. So many doodle dogs under 24 months would not be required to be euthanized because of congenital health problems or require multiple surgeries before the golden years or be on their 3rd and 4th home if only the purebred dogs already established with years of focus on bettering those breeds had been voices and promoted better.

So… why do I breed? I breed to preserve the health, conformation, and temperament of the Standard Poodle. I breed to educate the public and promote this superior breed. I breed to provide this extraordinary breed to families that need a dependable, healthy, breath taking dog that will have a positive life changing impact on their lives.









What is the difference between limited and full registration?

What is the difference between limited and full registration?

All of our dogs are AKC registered. There are two types of AKC registration, Limited and Unlimited/Full. If you buy your puppy on Limited registration, that means your new puppy is solely just a pet and you have NO breeding rights to your dog. Dogs on Limited registration cannot be show in AKC Conformation Shows, however, they can be shown in all other AKC sanctioned events. With Full registration, you have breeding and AKC conformation show rights to your dog. We do NOT sell breeding rights to doodle breeders! Full registration is only available to breeders whose goal is to improve and promote the purebred Standard Poodle breed!




How long have we been breeding Standard Poodles?

How long have we been breeding Standard Poodles?

We've been breeding Standard Poodles since 2016.




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